March 4, 2021
  • 6:33 am TNT NASCAR Summer Series grants “All-Access”Headline
  • 7:42 am Bankruptcy Judge Asks 50 Cent Why He Has Stacks Of Cash In Instagram Photos
  • 7:42 am George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Meryl Streep & More Announced For Bernie Worrell Fundraiser
  • 7:41 am Mining the Deep End in Search of a Utopian Dream: Envision Festival 2016
  • 7:35 am Phish Sneaks Sally Through San Francisco For A Monday Night Jammer [Recap]

first_imgThirteen-poundbabies may make headlines, but they aren’t the norm. In fact, U.S. infants aregetting smaller, according to Harvard researchers at the Harvard Pilgrim Health CareInstitute’s Department of Population Medicine, an affiliate of Harvard MedicalSchool (HMS). Their findings, published in the February issue of Obstetrics &Gynecology, suggest that birth weights in this country have declined during thepast 15 years.The studyanalyzed data on birth weight, maternal and neonatal characteristics, obstetriccare, and other trends from the National Center for Health Statistics NatalityData Set, looking at 36,827,828 U.S. babies born at full-term between 1990 and2005. Birth weight — a combination of fetal growth and length of gestation — wasrecorded in grams. The investigators teased out certain factors, including themother’s age, race or ethnicity, education level, marital status, and tobaccouse, as well as the amount of weight the women gained during pregnancy and howearly in pregnancy they received prenatal care. They also considered thewomen’s risk of conditions such as hypertension and use of obstetric proceduressuch as induction of labor and Caesarean delivery.Their findingscame as a surprise. “Previous studies have shown that birth weights haveincreased steadily during the past half century,” said Emily Oken, an HMS assistant professor of population medicine. “We expected to seea continuation of those increases.” Higher birth weights have beenattributed in part to women’s increasing age and weight and decreased smoking.Instead, Oken andher colleagues found that birth weights had decreased by an average of 52 grams(1.83 ounces) between 1990 and 2005. Decreases were especially notable after1995.In contrast toprevious research findings, birth weights fell even further in infants born toa subset of women considered to be at low risk for small babies. Mothers whowere white, well-educated, married, didn’t smoke, received early prenatal care,and delivered vaginally with no complications hadbabies who weighed an average of 79 grams (2.78 ounces) less at birth duringthe study period.The causes ofthis decline remain unclear. In addition to declines in birth weight, averagegestation length among these full-term births also dropped by more than twodays. “A logical conclusion might be that trends in obstetric management, suchas greater use of Caesarean delivery and induction of labor, mightaccount for these decreases in birth weight and gestation length,” said Oken.“However, our analysis showed that this was not the case.”While the declinemay simply represent a reversal of previous increases in birth weights, it mayalso be cause for concern. Babies born small not only face short-termcomplications such as increased likelihood of requiring intensive care afterbirth and even higher risk of death, but they may also beat higher riskfor chronic diseases in adulthood.Future researchmay identify factors not included in the current data that might contribute tolower birth weight, such as trends in mothers’ diets, physical activity,stress, and exposure to environmental toxins. “There’s still a lot we don’tknow about the causes of low birth weight,”said Oken. “Moreresearch needs to be done.”The research wassupported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgIn honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, members of the Saint Mary’s community gathered together to host a panel remembering Dr. King’s message of fostering an inclusive community titled “First Generation College Students.” “We are doing this in honor of Dr. King and his message to include everybody,” Tamara Taylor, assistant director of Student Involvement and Multicultural Affairs, said. “I am a first-generation college student and during my time in school I often felt excluded and forgotten. It is important to recognize the different struggles individuals are going through on campus.” In addition to Taylor, the panel also included other faculty members, all of who consider themselves first-generation college students. ? Topics varied from financial aid and parental support to mentorship advice and campus involvement, but each panelist offered her own experience. “My father eventually went to college after he served in World War II and had access to the GI Bill,” Jan Pilarski, a professor in the Justice Education Program, said. “His college experience was not typical and he could not offer me much advice in terms of my education. He pushed for me to be a doctor and it became a struggle for both me and him when I decided to step off that path.” This theme of dealing with friends and family after starting the college experience was expressed by more than one panelist. Bettina Spencer, a professor from the psychology department, also alluded to how different her home in Detroit felt after she started her undergraduate degree at a small liberal arts college in New York. “It was a struggle,” Spencer said. “In fact, it still is a struggle. I went to college and sometimes felt as though I didn’t fit in there, and then I would come home and realize I no longer fully fit in there either. I had to redo my boundaries with certain family members.” Being a first-generation college student is hard enough, but Stacy Davis, a professor in the religious studies and gender and women’s studies departments, said being a scholarship student added to the difficulties. “It is a very scary thing to be a scholarship student at a school with a lot of money,” Davis said. “Academics at the college level are a whole different world. I was the only non-white student out of 60 students in the honors program and everyday was a challenge. It was not until my junior year that I met non-middle class students and truly felt as though I found my people and niche.” All four panelists agreed that the first two years of their college experiences were the most difficult because they did not find a community to which they belonged. “I had a very different experience in the fact that I became a teen mom and then decided to attend college,” Taylor said. “I struggled with the workload and loans. It was not until I became a McNair Scholar at Central Michigan University my junior year that I felt mentored and included in the campus community.” This idea of mentorship and involvement were the two key points each panelist pinpointed as a turning point in their college careers. “I had two very good mentors,” Davis said. “They both taught me that if you are not having fun then the major isn’t right for you.” Each panelist attributed her time as being a first-generation college student to a unique perspective she can now bring to the table in her job. ?“After a difficult moment in one of my classes during my undergrad, I had to ask myself the question, ‘Is this threat or a challenge?’ I decided it was a challenge and from then on when I come across difficult situations I ask myself the same question,” Spencer said. The panelists agreed it was these difficult moments of overcoming hardships that led them to appreciate their undergraduate degree. “My advice to offer you is to circle the graduation date,” Davis said. “Keep that date right in front of your face. Once you cross that finish line it is well worth it. Out of all the degrees hanging on my wall I am most proud of my undergraduate one.”last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Longview Daily News:In a potentially fatal blow to the Longview coal project, a federal judge Tuesday upheld the state of Washington’s denial of a key water quality permit for the $680 million export dock.Judge Robert Bryan of U.S. District Court in Tacoma dismissed claims by Lighthouse Resources and BNSF Railway that the permit denial preempted the Interstate Commerce Commission Termination Act and the Ports and Waterways Safety Act. Bryan found the companies failed to prove that the federal acts should have barred the state Department of Ecology from denying the water permit.Millennium began the permitting process for the coal terminal in 2012. The state denied its application for a water quality certificate in September 2017, pointing to “significant unavoidable adverse impacts” outlined in the Final Environmental Impact Assessment for the project. The state also said it didn’t have reasonable assurance that the terminal would meet applicable water quality standards.Lighthouse Resources sued Gov. Jay Inslee’s administration over the decision in January. Six coal-producing states — Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Utah, Kansas and Nebraska — intervened in the suit on behalf of Lighthouse and the railroad, alleging that Washington was blocking interstate commerce by blocking the project.Bryan’s decision is another in a string of setbacks for Millennium, which is in other legal tangles with the state over the project. In addition, last month the company cut 15 percent of its Longview staff and announced the retirement of its CEO, Bill Chapman.The terminal would be the largest on the U.S. West Coast and would ship 44 million tons of Rocky Mountain coal to Asia, requiring eight round trips to the terminal site at the old Reynolds Metals Co. aluminum plant. Millennium says it would create 1,000 construction jobs to build and about 130 workers to operate at full development.More: Federal judge dismisses more Millennium claims against state Proposed Washington state coal export terminal loses another court battlelast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgEIA: Renewables could overtake U.S. gas generation by 2034 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Platts:Renewable energy is projected not only to crowd out coal-fired and nuclear generation but also to overtake natural gas as the dominant fuel for power generation by 2045, according to the main reference case the U.S. Energy Information Administration put forth Jan. 29.Gas-fired combined-cycle generation capacity is expected to be “added steadily throughout the projection period to meet rising demand,” the EIA said in its 2020 Annual Energy Outlook. However, the reference case shows gas use for electricity dipping slightly to 36% of the power mix in 2050, compared with 37% in 2019. A year earlier, the outlook saw gas growing from 34% of the mix in 2018 to 39% by 2050.The agency’s reference case assumes cost reductions for renewables will gradually taper off. But the EIA’s “low renewables cost” case assumes renewables achieve overnight capital costs in 2050 that are 40% lower than in the reference case.Under that scenario, renewable generation inches ahead of gas in 2034 and continues an upward trajectory toward providing nearly 3 trillion kWh of electricity by 2050. Gas-fired generation, in that case, remains flat, supplying between 1.5 trillion and 1.6 trillion kWh throughout the projection period. The case assuming lower costs for renewables expects gas-fired generation to start leveling off in the 2020s.Gas prices in the reference case stay below $4/MMBtu through 2035, with abundant lower-cost resources, mostly in Permian Basin tight oil plays. Across all cases, the outlook projects gas production will exceed consumption, enabling increased exports even though production growth slows to less than 1% a year in the 2020s in the reference case.Gas consumption slows after reaching 31.9 Tcf in 2020 and stays flat through 2030, then rises 1% a year with higher power sector and industrial sector use. The industrials category, which wraps in LNG feedgas, is the biggest consumer after 2021.[Maya Weber and Jasmin Melvin]More: EIA: Gas-fired power to lose out to renewables, even with sustained gas outputlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

READ MORE

first_imgThe latest data regarding the outbreak would be available every day from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., and the center would regularly hold press conferences, Juri went on to say.He added that updated information on 243 Indonesian citizens quarantined in Natuna, Riau Islands, would be among the information provided by the center.Read also: Indonesia readies plans for post-quarantine period: Health MinistryExecutive Office of the President undersecretary on human development Abetnego Tarigan expressed hope that the centralized distribution of information regarding the outbreak would avoid any stigmatization of the Wuhan evacuees quarantined in Natuna. The Executive Office of the President has opened an integrated information center to publish official data and information regarding the novel coronavirus at its office in the Bina Graha building in the Presidential Palace complex, Central Jakarta.The office’s undersecretary for political information and communication, Juri Ardiantoro, said on Friday that the information center would provide transparent data on a regular basis to avoid misinformation regarding the outbreak.“The information center will provide updates on the handling of the 2019-nCov in an integrated system [with input from] ministries, institutions and regional administrations,” Juri said at a press conference in Jakarta on Friday as quoted by news agency Antara. Meanwhile, the office’s undersecretary for politics, law, defense and human rights, Jaleswari Pramodhawardani, said she had met with the Natuna community and local officials during a visit on Thursday.She added that her team was assuring the local community that the government was actively handling the outbreak and would provide clear information to the public about what was happening there.“Unfortunately, we did not have direct contact with the evacuees being observed, because that is part of compliance with the WHO protocol,” she said,?referring to the World Health Organization.Jaleswari said Natuna residents had accepted the government’s move to quarantine Wuhan evacuees on the island after receiving clear information from law enforcement authorities and government officials.The government’s decision to quarantine the evacuees there had previously been met with opposition from residents concerned about the coronavirus spreading in the region.“The government will always guarantee observation in accordance with health standards and protocols,”?she?said.?(syk)Topics :last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgMikel Arteta confident on Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s Arsenal’s future after FA Cup final win Comment Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 1 Aug 2020 8:05 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.4kShares Arsenal won the FA Cup (Picture; Getty)‘I want to build the squad around him. I think he wants to stay and it is just about getting the deal done.‘But I think these moments will help him to realise and believe that we are in the right path and he is a big part of that. More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘He is loved by everybody at the club. Hopefully he can continue with us.’Asked if he will extend his contract, Arteta added: ‘I think he will, yes.’Will Aubameyang sign a new deal at Arsenal?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your resultsFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisement Arteta wants Aubameyang to stay (Picture: AFP via Getty)Mikel Arteta believes Arsenal’s talisman Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang will commit his future to the club after his FA Cup final-winning display against Chelsea. Aubameyang scored twice in a 2-1 win at an empty Wembley Stadium, taking his total goals tally to 29 in all competitions. He has less than a year left on his contract at the Emirates and has been linked with a summer transfer. It had been claimed that his future may rest on Saturday’s final, with a potential lack of European football in defeat set to convince him he should leave. ADVERTISEMENTBut after a fine victory over the Blues, Arteta thinks Aubameyang will be an Arsenal player next season.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘He knows what I think about him,’ Arteta told the BBC after the win. Advertisementlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgDjibouti Africa Regional Express 1 (DARE1) submarine cable system has landed at it’s final stop – the great Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa.?The cable is being developed by Djibouti Telecom, Somtel, Telkom Kenya and SubCom.When completed, the DARE1 network will land across 3 countries and 4 cities, covering 5,000km and will have a capacity per wavelength of 100Gbps.The landing stations, located in Djibouti (Djibouti), Bosaso (Puntland), Mogadishu (Somalia) and Mombasa (Kenya), will help enhance connectivity in the east African region and will enable more efficient communications.A couple of weeks ago the cable landed in Mogadishu and Bossaso and this was the last leg at Mombasa, Kenya.According to Djibouti Telecom, the network is on schedule to be fully operational by June 2020.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgILOILO City – He allegedly stole deodorantand lotion from a mall in Barangay San Rafael, Madurriao district. A security guard from the mall said hefound the stolen items inside Jarandilla’ sling bag. Jarandilla was detained in the custodialfacility of the Mandurria police station. Charges will be filed against him./PNcenter_img The 19-year-old Jose Philip Jarandilla ofBarangay Bantud Frabrica, Dumangas, Iloilo was arrested around 6:45 p.m. onNov. 18, police said. last_img

READ MORE

first_imgJoining Roger D. Howard, DCH President/CEO and Tom Fuller, Vice President of Physician Network and Clinical Services (far right and far left respectively) for an early look at the facility are (left to right) Amy Works, FNP; John Ingram, Milan Town Manager; Robert Branigan and Paul Hildebrand, Milan Town Board Members; and Dale Holbert, Milan Clerk/Treasurer.Residents of Milan and the surrounding area will soon have a convenient new primary care health facility in their community. Milan Primary Care, operated by Dearborn County Hospital, will open to the public in February. The office is located on State Route 350, just west of its intersection with State Route 101, next to Subway.Comprised of more than 1,700 square feet, the facility will feature five examination/treatment rooms in addition to public and ancillary areas. Adult and pediatric patients can be seen for routine or non-emergent care; to receive an injection, such as a flu shot or vaccine; or to have blood drawn or a specimen collected.Caring for patients at the new facility will be Amy Works, Family Nurse Practitioner. Initially, Mrs. Works will see patients by appointment Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and on Friday from 8:00 a.m. until noon. Once the facility is established, the office hours may be modified to more accurately serve the needs of the community.Mrs. Works is certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. She has approximately 38 years of hospital nursing experience including more than 20 years as an Emergency Department nurse. For the past 3? years she has worked in the DCH Emergency Department as a Family Nurse Practitioner.A longtime resident of Rising Sun, Mrs. Works earned her undergraduate degrees in nursing at Indiana University and Indiana Wesleyan University. She then went on to receive her Family Nurse Practitioner training/Masters of Science in Nursing Degree from Ball State University.“I am looking forward to using my training and experience to care for patients at Milan Primary Care,” noted Mrs. Works. “As a Family Nurse Practitioner, my role is to provide preventive care; to diagnose and treat patients for common illnesses; to monitor and address symptoms associated with chronic diseases; and to educate and empower patients to take an active role in maintaining or improving their health. I will also work closely with DCH Physician Partners, as well as area specialists, for the referral of patients when appropriate.”For more information regarding Milan Primary Care or to make an appointment, please call (812)654-7037. Milan Primary Care is located at 124 W. Indian Trail (State Route 350), Suite B, in Milan.last_img read more

READ MORE
亚洲中文字幕人成影院_亚洲色炮av图_抽搐一进一出gif试看体验区