January 18, 2021
  • 9:38 am NASA Rolls Out ‘Launch America’ Campaign
  • 9:34 am Schumer Asks Barrett To Recuse Herself From Some Cases If Confirmed
  • 7:48 am Happy 93rd Birthday, Carol Channing!
  • 7:48 am Oprah Winfrey & Audra McDonald Want to Make You Cry in ‘Night, Mother
  • 7:47 am Nina Arianda Starts Previews in Tales from Red Vienna

first_img View Comments It’s time for your official Sarah Brightman space update!?To prepare for her blastoff from the International Space Station on September 1, the Phantom of the Opera favorite is currently enrolled in a space training program in Russia, where she’s taking Zero Gravity simulation flights and presumably practicing her scales for her Andrew Lloyd Webber space concert. Check out these Facebook photos of the star preparing for blastoff—you alone can make our song?starship take flight, Sarah.last_img

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first_imgKiller casting! After circling the project for some time, Benjamin Walker will headline the previously reported American Psycho musical on Broadway. Directed by Rupert Goold, the production will begin performances on February 19 at a Shubert theater to be announced. Opening night is scheduled for March 21.Walker recently appeared in a workshop for the tuner. His Great White Way credits include Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, Les Liaisons Dangereuses and Inherit the Wind. He starred as the titular presidential slayer in the film Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.American Psycho features music and lyrics by Tony and Grammy winner Duncan Sheik and a book by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa. Based on the novel by Bret Easton Ellis, the tuner?follows 26-year-old Patrick Bateman (Walker): a sophisticated, rich and devastatingly handsome Wall Street banker in 1980s New York City. He’s got a sculpted body, a model-gorgeous girlfriend and a to-die-for apartment. There’s just one snag: Patrick can’t get the blood out of his $5000 suits, because he also has a murderous, psychopathic alter ego that he hides from his friends and co-workers. The novel was adopted into an acclaimed film in 2000 starring Christian Bale and Reese Witherspoon.The show premiered?at London’s Almeida Theatre in December 2013 and had?been set?to make its U.S. premiere at Second Stage off-Broadway in February 2015. Show Closed This production ended its run on June 5, 2016 View Comments Related Shows Star Files American Psycho Benjamin Walkerlast_img read more

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first_img View Comments The world premiere of Sarah Burgess’ Dry Powder opens officially at the Public Theater on March 22. The play, directed by Hamilton’s Thomas Kail, stars The Office’s John Krasinski in his stage debut and Homeland Emmy winner Claire Danes.To commemorate the off-Broadway production’s big night, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson created this portrait of the whole cast in action. In addition to Krasinski and Danes as Seth and Jenny, respectively, the sketch features Hank Azaria as Rick and Sanjit De Silva as Jeff Schrader.Broadway.com wishes the team at Dry Powder a happy opening! ? Justin “Squigs” Robertson About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. Dry Powder Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on May 1, 2016last_img read more

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first_img? Justin “Squigs” Robertson Kinky Boots’s current cast members have got us saying “Yeah, yeah”! Aaron C. Finley and Todrick Hall are now starring in the Tony-winning production as Charlie Price and Lola, respectively. To celebrate their entry into the Land of Lola, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson gave them the ink treatment, and it’s the most beautiful thing in the world. Good luck not shouting “Yasssss” at the image of Finley with the signature crimson boot and Hall striking a pose! Take a look at the red-hot sketch of the dynamic, divalicious duo, and see Kinky Boots at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre! View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on April 7, 2019 Kinky Boots About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home.last_img read more

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first_img Related Shows An entire company is making its Broadway debut in Andrew Upton’s The Present, which officially opens on January 8 at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre. Directed by John Crowley, Upton’s adaptation of Chekhov’s Platonov stars Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett alongside Richard Roxburgh.Set post-Perestroika in the mid-1990s, The Present follows the widow Anna Petrovna (Blanchett) as she celebrates her birthday with a slew of guests; over the course of the party, unresolved relationships and regret quickly rise to the surface.To honor this adaptation of Chekhov’s tale, which also features Anna Bamford, Andrew Buchanan, David Downer, Eamon Farren, Martin Jacobs, Brandon McClelland, Jacqueline McKenzie, Marshall Napier, Susan Prior, Chris Ryan and Toby Schmitz, Broadway.com Resident Artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson gave the cast the Broadway Ink treatment.?Broadway.com wishes The Present’s cast a gift of an opening night and a wonderful time making their Great White Way debut! Catch the show at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre. View Comments About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. The Present ? Justin “Squigs” Robertson Show Closed This production ended its run on March 19, 2017last_img read more

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first_img Photo: WayneMcLaurin Did you forget to plant at the proper time? Were you too busy to plant? All excuses are accepted. Best of all, it’s still not too late to get in a garden.Many vegetables can still be planted in the last week of April or even into May. It will surprise you, too, just how quickly they grow. Many vegetables don’t do well in colder soils. Now, in warmer soil, they will take off and grow. Peppers are “hot” in late-planted Georgia gardens.center_img Here’s a look at some of the things you can grow.Plant late tomatoes. As the earlier tomatoes are retiring from production, the late-planted ones will be coming on for great eating. You can even take the suckers off the early ones and root them. Just keep them watered. Extend the great tomato season.Incredible EggplantI know many people don’t like eggplant — but it’s so good! Its dark purple fruits make it quite a pretty plant, but when you stuff those fruits with shrimp, they’re magnificent. Eggplant doesn’t do well until soils warm up in May, so now is a good time to plant.You can plant the hottest item in the garden, too, in May. Over the past few years, hot peppers — Aji, Ancho, Cayenne, Charleston Hot, Inferno, Ring of Fire, Habanero, Jalapeno, Serano, Thai Hot, Tabasco — comprise the single biggest increase in garden crops.If you have room, plant sweet potatoes, a true hot-weather crop. Get the slips from someone, or take tip cuttings (the last 8 inches of the vines). Or get some sweet potatoes from the grocery store and sprout them for the cuttings. Next fall, you’ll be glad you planted them, when the weather is cool and you smell sweet potatoes baking.Never Too Much OkraIt’s also a good time to plant one of my favorite vegetables: okra. Having grown up with it in the garden every year, on the table four or five times a week in season and frozen or pickled at other times, I still love it.Okra is from tropical Africa and does best when planted later in the season. I’ve heard all of the stories and jokes about the properties of okra “juice,” but this texture can be remedied.Allow small, raw okra in Italian salad dressing to marinate for 1 hour — this is much like a pickled product and is excellent in salads.However, remember that the properties that make okra objectionable for some uneducated palates is the critical ingredient for making that famous Creole shrimp gumbo.There’s still plenty of time for good gardening and even greater eating from your garden.last_img read more

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first_imgBy Brooke Hatfield and Johnny HarrellUniversity of Georgia “Just because you can see the opening doesn’t necessarily meanthat the nest itself is right there,” Delaplane said. “It couldbe several feet away.” “And No. 2, there’s an increase in the levels of outdooractivities — picnics and tailgaters, for example. And when youput the two together, you have problems,” Delaplane said. Don’t stand around or swatDelaplane had one word of advice for anyone who happens upon ayellow jacket nest: “Run.” In search of proteinBut it’s not just human flesh these bugs are after.”Wasps are carnivores,” he said, “and they will seek out any kindof protein they can find. And very often, that’s a hamburger or ahot dog at someone’s picnic. Two major factors contribute to this phenomenon.”No. 1, the wasp colonies are now reaching their highestpopulation of the year,” said Delaplane, an extension serviceentomologist with the UGA College of Agriculture andEnvironmental Science. Standing still and swatting at the bugs is the worst thing youcan do, while the average person can outrun a wasp, he said.It’s usually best to leave a nest alone. But if you do try toeradicate a nest, Delaplane advises you to wear protectiveclothing, a veil and a complete body-covering suit. Many people associate autumn with a smaller number of insects.But yellow jackets and wasps are actually more aggressive duringthe fall, said University of Georgia scientist Keith Delaplane.center_img “It may be very satisfying to see some of them die, but it’s nota very practical approach,” Delaplane said. If you use insecticide to destroy the nest, he said, saturate thearea around the entrance to the nest.Hard to find underground nestsUnderground wasp nests are a bit harder to pinpoint. In those cases, insecticide sprayed down the hole could totallymiss the nest, and painful stings could result. “The fact that they’re carnivores isn’t necessarily bad. Thewasps eat garden caterpillars, saving gardeners from having toresort to pesticides,” he said. “They just don’t appear to be sobeneficial when it’s your picnic they’re interrupting. In thegrand scheme of things, they do contribute.” “Very often, people don’t do that, and they end up getting veryserious stings,” he said. Most yellow jackets and wasps die out in late fall, so eventuallythe problem goes away on its own.last_img read more

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first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaPERRY, Ga. — Standing behind a table covered with art, photos and brochures, Sage Edwards isn’t representing herself. She’s standing in for Monticello, Ga., in Georgia’s first agritourism, or “farm fun,” symposium Nov. 14 at the Georgia National Fair & Agricenter.”Monticello is a favorite place to visit for a lot of tourists,” said Edwards, director of the Better Hometown and Downtown Development Authority in Monticello. “It’s a green place. … Agritourism is a big thing for our town.”Edwards said they recently hosted a group from China who wanted a “true Southern experience.” After feasting on country ham and biscuits, they toured Jasper County for some Georgia farm fun.Together, agriculture and related businesses make up the state’s top industry. Tourism is next. Pulling out-of-state visitors into Georgia is big business, with 62 million people in 2006. But it’s not the only market. And traditional tourism venues aren’t the only products.”There are a lot of people in Atlanta, and several hundred thousand have never seen a farm,” said Charlie Gatlin, Georgia’s deputy commissioner of tourism and marketing. “There’s a market right there for us to go after. All we need to do is tell the story.”Telling the story was one of many emphases of the “Symposium of Discovery: Agritourism and the Creative Economies in Georgia.” The Georgia Department of Economic Development, the Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development at the University of Georgia, Market Festival on the Square and Agri-Tour Solutions hosted the event.Attendees soaked up ideas and did a little marketing.Charles Cowart of Still Pond Vineyards and Winery near Arlington, Ga., told how his business went from growing grapes to bottling wine.Several years ago, he realized Still Pond needed an outlet, besides the fresh market, for their grapes. After starting with a pasteurized grape juice, they moved into wine. This year, they ran 900 tons of fruit through their facilities, with some of the juice going to other wineries and the rest processed in-house.They get customers down a 2-mile dirt road to their facility mainly by word of mouth.”There’s got to be a reason for them to come seek us out,” he said. “We’ve got to have a pretty package. We’ve got to have an excellent product in the package” and have “Southern hospitality” when people come. “You have to be passionate about what you’re doing.”AGNET, the CAED agritourism Web site (www.caed.uga.edu), lists 650 farm- and nature-related tourism venues in Georgia. These attractions, from farmers markets to fish hatcheries, have an off-the-farm value of $60 million a year.”We feel, given our natural advantages and the consumer demand, we can grow tremendously from that level,” CAED director John McKissick said.With only 2 percent to 4 percent of Georgians living on farms, having an organized voice would help. It’s a way to market what the state is already doing, said Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Tommy Irvin.”I’ve been on your farms,” he told the crowd. “I’ve been in your vineyards. I guess it’s no secret to us what we’re doing. But we have to tell others what we’re doing.”Scott Angle, dean and director of the UGA College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, noted the benefits of branded names in Georgia.”We’ve got some great examples here already,” he said, citing Vidalia onions and Claxton Fruit Cakes. “I know some people who have traveled to Georgia to spend a day learning what makes Vidalia onions different. … There are all kinds of things in Georgia that we could be marketing.”Cowart told of an Atlanta reporter who turned off his headlights on his way to Arlington and got his first real glimpse of stars.”There are a lot of people out there,” he said, “who long for a stay in our world.”last_img read more

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first_imgBy Pam KnoxUniversity of GeorgiaApril hit Georgia with almost every weather punch, including floods, hail, high winds, tornadoes and even two earthquakes.Except for a few isolated areas in far north-central counties, rainfall across the state was above normal. More than 10 inches of rain was observed by radar in southeast and south-central Georgia, with some isolated unofficial reports in the U.S. Department of Agriculture weekly crop bulletin listing over 20 inches. The highest official monthly total from the National Weather Service was 7.30 inches in Alma (4.14 inches above normal). The lowest total was in Augusta at 4.33 inches (1.39 inches above normal). Atlanta received 5.18 inches (1.56 inches above normal), Athens 4.47 inches (1.12 inches above normal), Columbus 6.53 inches (2.69 inches above normal), Macon inches 5.66 (2.52 inches above normal), Savannah 6.97 inches (3.65 inches above normal) and Brunswick 5.83 inches (3.03 above normal). Many daily records were set during the month at these stations, including 3.66 inches at Savannah on April 2.The highest one-day total rainfall from the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network was 6.53 inches near Baxley on the morning of April 3. There were also one-day totals in excess of six inches at Woodbine with 6.25 inches on April 1 and Moultrie with 6.04 inches on April.Rainfall and flooding closed schools near Tifton in south Georgia for two days early in the month. Major and near-record flooding occurred along several rivers in the area. Over 80 buildings were impacted by the flooding, including 62 owner-occupied homes and 20 rentals. Of these, 20 received minor damage, 44 had major damage, and 18 mobile homes were completely destroyed.In Atlanta, the monthly average temperature was 60.7 degrees (.9 degree below normal), in Athens 61 degrees (.1 degree above normal), Columbus 62.8 degrees (1.4 degrees below normal), Macon 62.6 degrees (.1 degree below normal), Savannah 65 degrees (.3 degrees below normal), Brunswick 67.3 degrees (.9 degree above normal), Alma 64.4 degrees (2.3 degrees below normal) and Augusta 62 degrees (.4 degree below normal). A record low of 32 degrees for the date was tied in Columbus on April 8.There were numerous severe weather events over the month, including over 30 preliminary reports of tornadoes. This is the most tornadoes in April in Georgia for a decade. Hail or high winds were observed somewhere in the state on at least 10 days, including a report of hail covering the ground in Elberton on April 14. Golf-ball-sized hail was reported at Turner Field in Atlanta on April 23.Tornadoes were reported April 5 in south Georgia, April 10 throughout the northern half of the state, April 13 in south Georgia, and near Atlanta and Columbus on April 19. One person was killed by a drought-stressed fallen tree near Buckhead in Atlanta on April 13, and more than 250,000 people were without power during the storms. One person was reported injured in Hancock County on April 10. Two people were reported injured near Woodstock near the Cobb County and Cherokee County border on April 19. Lightning caused a number of building fires on April 24 in and around Atlanta and caused the temporary evacuation of the control tower at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson airport, resulting in delays in arrivals and departures.Because of the heavy rains this month, farmers had a difficult time working in the fields. Many fields of corn had to be replanted due to soggy conditions. High winds and hail damaged peach and pecan trees. Mild frost damaged grapes, strawberries and blueberries the week ending on April 13. Two small earthquakes in Hancock and Baldwin counties on April 4 measured 3.1 and 2.2 on the Richter scale and were felt throughout the area. They could have been caused by shifting ground due to very wet soil.last_img read more

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first_imgPrincess Caroline will grow three to four feet tall. Princess Molly reaches only 18 inches tall. Princess Caroline is a lot more vigorous, but both can grow in some shade. For best results, though, give them a lot of sun, he said.Because it is smaller, Princess Molly will do better in the landscape if it doesn’t have a lot of tall competition. It will also thrive in a large pot.The grasses are fairly maintenance free, he said. A small amount of fertilizer at the beginning of the season is OK, but don’t fertilize too much for a desirable ornamental grass. They need water to get established. But once they are growing, they are very hearty plants for the southern climate. Princess Caroline and Princess Molly were developed by Wayne Hanna, a plant breeder with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in Tifton, Ga. The well known turfgrass breeder named the varieties after his granddaughters. The grasses are patented and licensed through the UGA Research Foundation.“One of the biggest benefits about them is they don’t produce any seed, they don’t produce any pollen,” Hanna said. “So, they stay pretty vegetative, and the benefit of that is you only get what you plant.”It also means the plants won’t invade into other areas of the landscape, he said. The University of Georgia recently released two drought-tolerant, disease-resistant ornamental grasses that can grow from a seedling to a full plant in one month. And, they don’t produce seed or pollen. Princess Molly and Princess Caroline will be available this spring at nurseries and other retail outlets across the country. Currently, four growers in Alabama and five in Georgia are propagating the plants. From Atlanta south, both grasses will overwinter and come back each spring. North of Atlanta and depending on the winter, they should be treated like annuals that die due to the cold.last_img read more

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