March 4, 2021
  • 6:33 am TNT NASCAR Summer Series grants “All-Access”Headline
  • 7:42 am Bankruptcy Judge Asks 50 Cent Why He Has Stacks Of Cash In Instagram Photos
  • 7:42 am George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Meryl Streep & More Announced For Bernie Worrell Fundraiser
  • 7:41 am Mining the Deep End in Search of a Utopian Dream: Envision Festival 2016
  • 7:35 am Phish Sneaks Sally Through San Francisco For A Monday Night Jammer [Recap]

first_imgLoad remaining images After spending a few weeks in the Midwest and Northeast,?Phish?kicked off a West Coast tour last weekend with two nights at?The Gorge Amphitheatre?in George, WA. After?a fun-filled day off that saw guitarist?Trey Anastasio perform with street musicians and?Mike Gordon?collaborate with?Phil Lesh?& Friends?at?Terrapin Crossroads, the band regrouped for the first of three nights at the storied?Bill Graham Civic Auditorium. The relatively intimate venue (capacity is 7,000, compared to the Gorge’s 20,000) is always a favorite destination along Phish’s summer tours, and the band did not disappoint in their return visit.Phish?opened the show with “Martian Monster,” getting loose and funky to kick off a solid show throughout. With jams like “Halley’s Comet” > “46 Days” in the first frame, fans were getting down from the getgo. Slower choices like “Sugar Shack,” “Roggae” and “Daniel Saw The Stone” came next, but the latter segued into an all-out “Divided Sky.” “Ocelot” followed, with “Ya Mar” containing the biggest jam of the night. The band again swapped instruments, with Anastasio?taking on the Marimba Lumina, before Gordon and keyboardist?Page McConnell?swapped instruments. The silliness belies the band’s happiness for performance, and a rocking “Possum” capped off a great first set.The second set was loose and funky, with a set-opening “Golden Age” > “Twist” to get things rocking for a full 20 minutes of Phish?jamming. The band then brought out “My Sweet One” for a little upbeat fun, and took that into Fuego?track “The Line.” After a free-for-all “Simple,” Phish?played their first cover of Allen Toussaint’s?“Sneaking Sally Through The Alley” of the year. The tune kept Bill Graham rocking with 18 minutes of pure funk- the longest jam of the night- before?“Limb By Limb” followed with its high energy grooves. “Slave to the Traffic Light” put a cap on?a full hour-plus of continuous music.?With more time remaining, Phish?brought out their second tour debut of the night,?Los Lobos’?“When The Circus Comes.” The slow-dance number kept fans smiling, but it was “Run Like An Antelope” that had the final notes of the evening. What a show!Phish?returns to the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium tonight for round two of three. Check out the full setlist?form Phish.net, below.Setlist: Phish?at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, CA – 7/18/16Set 1: Martian Monster, Halley’s Comet > 46 Days, Sugar Shack, Roggae, Daniel Saw the Stone > Divided Sky, Ocelot > Ya Mar[1], PossumSet 2: Golden Age > Twist > My Sweet One > The Line > Simple > Sneakin’ Sally Through the Alley > Limb By Limb > Slave to the Traffic LightEncore: When the Circus Comes, Run Like an Antelope[1] Trey on Marimba Lumina; Mike on guitar; Page on bass.Notes: Ya Mar featured Trey on Marimba Lumina, Mike on guitar, and Page on bass. Simple contained a Magilla tease from Page.Photos by Jeffrey Dupuis; full gallery can be seen below.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgEarlier in the year, an all-star reggae group,?Natural Selectah, was born in Denver, Colorado. Featuring a revolving lineup of musicians, the band makes use of the many touring musicians who make the Mile Hile City their home, with the band previously featuring members from?Thievery Corporation,?The Motet,?Pimps Of Joytime, Pretty Lights Live Band,?The New Mastersounds,?DubSkin, Euforquesta,?SunSquabi,?and more. Outside of the all-star lineup that Natural Selectah frequently boasts, one of the best aspects of the group’s shows is their covers of non-reggae songs and give them the full reggae treatment.The Nth Power Crew Welcomes Members of Antibalas, Break Science, And More For Reggae Night [Full Audio]Yesterday, Natural Selectah released a video of the group covering the?Hall & Oates?classic, “I Can’t Go For That.” Featuring vocalist?Haile Supreme?front and center, the reggae side project’s lineup for this dubby cover of Hall & Oates also sees fine performances by some of our favorite musicians from Thievery, The Motet, Pimps Of Joytime, and more.?You can check out the video for yourself below, which was recorded live at the Denver recording studio, Scanhope Sound. You can also catch Natural Selectah live on September 20th at?Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom when the crew opens for?Shaggy, with tickets available here. read more

READ MORE

first_imgIt was a change for the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum. In a space that has hosted enough leaders and politicians to rival CNN, suddenly there was song.Negro spirituals by the group DivinePURPOSE filled the hall Dec. 4 as Henry Louis Gates Jr. led the ninth annual Du Bois Medal ceremony, the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute‘s highest honor, which goes to individuals whose work has made a significant contribution to African and African-American culture. Gates, director of the institute and the Alphonse Fletcher Jr. University Professor, called the event, which was co-sponsored by the Institute of Politics, “the biggest of the year.”The music was just part of the uplifting but poignant commemoration, sobered by the death a month ago of one of the honorees, Cambridge storytelling legend Hugh M. “Brother Blue” Hill ’48. Blue was a decades-long fixture around Boston and Cambridge, renowned for his tales, which he spun while wearing his trademark bright blue clothing and a butterfly necklace. Blue’s widow, Ruth Edmonds Hill, accepted his medal for what Gates described as “his desire to build a better world, one story at a time.”Writer and journalist Calvin Trillin was on hand to present the award to his friend, journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, whom he first met in Georgia, when Hunter-Gault was 19 and “already sassy,” he said.Hunter-Gault and Hamilton E. Holmes were the first blacks admitted to the University of Georgia in 1961, ending segregation there, amid riots and controversy.“I was a reporter then, covering the Civil Rights struggle,” Trillin recalled, “and I noticed that, even at that age, she had the ability to stand outside what was happening to her and observe it ironically.”Trillin thanked Hunter-Gault for his “education in the South.” He said, “I thought I had a pretty good understanding of segregation,” but was ultimately schooled when Hunter-Gault informed him of an unpleasant train ride she’d had, and Trillin replied, “I thought that was supposed to be a great train?” Hunter-Gault responded, “Not where we have to sit.”“I realized I hadn’t understood much about segregation until then,” said Trillin. “I’m happy to say that, partly because of her efforts, she can sit anywhere she pleases.”“I actually feel quite at home,” said Hunter-Gault, accepting her medal. “I feel as though I am a child of Du Bois, and I will wear this proudly.”William Julius Wilson, Lewis P. and Linda L. Geyser University Professor, introduced another award winner, New York Times op-ed columnist Bob Herbert, saying that Herbert strove to “arouse the consciousness of the masses with his stories on social justice,” and labeled him a “humble man, and a great listener.”“Many of Bob Herbert’s articles are about people in trouble, often through no fault of their own, and their misfortunes are not rare,” said Wilson. “And Herbert insightfully traces these problems to abuses of power and social injustice, not only in this country, but around the world.”Herbert argued his own humility, joking that newspaper columnists need “the arrogance to rant and rave 100 or more times a year.”“But I do feel humble tonight,” he said, noting that his father — just one generation back — could’ve never have held Herbert’s jobs.Also honored were philanthropists Daniel and Joanna S. Rose, who helped to fund many educational and cultural institutions, including the Du Bois Institute, where they are members of the National Advisory Board; Frank H. Pearl, the Perseus Books founder; and Princeton University President Shirley M. Tilghman, who was honored for her devotion to African-American studies, which led to establishing the Center for African American Studies at Princeton in 2006.Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annette Gordon-Reed recounted how she came to know lawyer and political adviser Vernon E. Jordan Jr., another medal winner, when he contacted her to help write his memoir “Vernon Can Read!”“The truth, of course, is that Vernon Jordan helped change my life, even before we first met,” said Gordon-Reed.Jordan’s legal career began with his clerk work in the landmark desegregation case that admitted Hunter-Gault to the University of Georgia.“Vernon Jordan has been an extraordinary presence in American history for nearly half a century,” said Gates. “He has guided us all to a much better place.”Jordan said that in his senior year at a “dilapidated, segregated” Georgia high school, he was offered admission to Dartmouth College by the president of the Atlanta-based alumni association.“He told me, ‘We want you to go to Dartmouth College, get a good education, and then come back to Atlanta and be a Booker T. Washington for your people.’”Washington and Du Bois disagreed on the strategies for how best to attain progress for blacks. Washington pushed for blacks to advance their own lives but to accept discrimination; Du Bois argued against that aspect, and helped to found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.Jordan did not accept the Dartmouth offer, instead attending DePauw University. “I am a W.E.B. Du Bois man,” he said. “That’s why this medal means so much to me.”To view the event.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgWilliam F. Lee, A.B. ’72, will become the Harvard Corporation’s senior fellow next summer, succeeding Robert D. Reischauer, A.B. ’63, the University announced today.Reischauer, president emeritus of the Urban Institute, and Robert E. Rubin, A.B. ’60, former U.S. treasury secretary and now co-chair of the Council on Foreign Relations, each plan to step down on June 30, 2014, after 12 years of service, consistent with the norms recently adopted by the Corporation.Reischauer, senior fellow since 2010, has played a leading role in advancing the set of historic governance reforms approved in December 2010.Lee, a member of the Corporation since 2010 and a distinguished intellectual property expert at the law firm WilmerHale, was elected by his Corporation colleagues to become senior fellow as of July 1, 2014.*Reischauer, who grew up in Cambridge and Belmont, Mass., before graduating from Harvard College in 1963, joined the Corporation in 2002 after a six-year term on Harvard’s Board of Overseers. Along with President Drew Faust, he guided the wide-ranging review that led to recent years’ governance reforms, intended to expand the Corporation’s capacity and intensify its focus on issues of long-term strategy and policy. The changes included expanding the Corporation from seven to 13 members and creating new committees on facilities and capital planning, finance, and governance.“I have long treasured my relationship with Harvard,” said Reischauer. “It has been a particular privilege to work with Harvard’s presidents and my Corporation and Overseer colleagues to strengthen the University during these times of unprecedented challenge, promise, and institutional change. Together we have sought to ensure that Harvard continues to be the leader in a rapidly changing environment. The world needs the best possible education and research, and that makes the aspirations and creativity of Harvard’s remarkable faculty, students, and staff all the more crucial.”“Bob Reischauer has been a deeply dedicated and extraordinarily effective senior fellow, guiding the Corporation through a time of transformative change,” said Faust. “His legacy, as the senior fellow who did so much to shape and implement our recent governance reforms, will carry on for decades ahead. I’m immensely grateful for his leadership, his insight and counsel, and his unwavering personal support.”Reischauer chairs the Corporation’s governance committee, and is past chair of its finance committee, its committee on shareholder responsibility, and the governing boards’ joint committee on inspection (the University’s audit committee).Now a distinguished institute fellow and president emeritus of the Urban Institute, a nonpartisan economic and social policy research organization in Washington, D.C., Reischauer served as the institute’s president from 2000 to 2012. From 1989 to 1995, he was director of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). Both before and after his tenure as CBO director, he was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Academy of Social Insurance, Reischauer is a recognized policy expert on the federal budget, Medicare, Social Security, poverty, and welfare. He is one of the two public trustees of the Social Security and Medicare trust funds, was vice chair of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission from 2001 to 2008, and serves on the boards of several educational and nonprofit organizations. He received his master of international affairs degree (1966) and his Ph.D. in economics (1971), both from Columbia.*Rubin, a fellow of Harvard College since 2002, serves on the Corporation’s finance committee and the joint committee on inspection. Like Reischauer, he was a member of the University’s presidential search committee in 2006-07, and he served on the governance review committee in 2010. He also serves on the University’s Global Advisory Council.“Harvard has thrived over decades through a willingness to aim high and to embrace change,” Rubin said. “That outlook will remain crucial, as global competition intensifies and as Harvard seeks to link its Schools and engage complex challenges in novel ways. I have greatly valued my time on the Corporation and the opportunity to serve an institution whose activities and aspirations represent American universities’ immensely important role in the world and the value of higher education for the individual and for society.”“Bob Rubin has constantly enhanced the Corporation’s deliberations with his incisiveness, his commitment to excellence, and his rare mix of perspectives from public service, finance, and global affairs,” said Faust. “He has been a strong voice in encouraging efforts to connect Harvard’s different parts and in pressing to assure that Harvard does all it should to assure its leadership for the long term. I very much appreciate his thoughtful, farsighted service to the University.”Now the co-chair of the Council on Foreign Relations, Rubin served as the nation’s 70th secretary of the treasury from 1995 to 1999. From 1993 to 1995 he was assistant to the president for economic policy and the first director of the National Economic Council. He earlier spent more than 25 years at Goldman, Sachs & Co., where he rose to become co-senior partner and co-chairman from 1990 to 1992. After leaving federal service, he was a member of the board of directors at Citigroup and a senior adviser to the company from 1999 to 2009. He chairs the board of the Local Initiatives Support Corporation, a leading community development support organization, and is co-founder of the Brookings Institution’s Hamilton Project. He also serves on the board of trustees of Mount Sinai Medical Center.A summa graduate of Harvard College in 1960, Rubin received his LL.B. from Yale in 1964. He holds honorary degrees from both Harvard and Yale, among other universities, and is the author of “In an Uncertain World: Tough Choices from Wall Street to Washington” (2003, with Jacob Weisberg).*Lee is a partner and former co-managing partner of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr, one of the nation’s most prominent law firms, with some 1,000 lawyers and 14 offices in the United States, Europe, and Asia. He is a leading intellectual property (IP) litigator who has represented a wide range of technology-focused clients over more than 35 years. His scores of trials and appeals have focused on such diverse matters as smartphones, laser optics, secure Internet communications, pharmaceutical products, medical devices, and genetically engineered food.Among his many honors, Lee has been named one of the country’s 100 most influential lawyers (National Law Journal, 2000, 2006, 2013), outstanding U.S. IP practitioner of the year (Managing IP, 2009, 2013), and one of the nation’s litigators of the year (American Lawyer, 2012).“Bill Lee’s wisdom and humanity, his blend of imagination and pragmatism, and his savvy about organizations and about people make him an exceptionally effective and admirable leader,” said Faust. “His interests, concerns, and relationships range across the University, and he knows that innovation is one of Harvard’s proudest traditions. All of us on the Corporation consider ourselves fortunate to have, in Bill Lee, so worthy a successor to Bob Reischauer.”“I am deeply honored and humbled to have been chosen to serve as senior fellow,” said Lee. “Harvard is the most extraordinary academic institution in the world, and I look forward to working with our president, my fellow Corporation members, and the broader Harvard community to ensure that it remains so. Bob Reischauer has been a wonderful leader, pioneering fundamental changes in our governance. I can only hope that we will build upon all he has accomplished.”A member of Harvard’s Board of Overseers from 2002 to 2008, Lee was chair of the board’s committee on finance, administration, and management; vice chair of its executive committee; and one of the Overseer members of the presidential search committee in 2006-07. He joined the Corporation in 2010 and serves as chair of the Joint Committee on Inspection; he is also a member of the Corporation committees on governance, facilities and capital planning, and shareholder responsibility. He has taught intellectual property litigation at Harvard Law School (HLS), as well as the January problem-solving workshop that HLS introduced in 2010.After graduating from Harvard College in 1972, Lee received his J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Cornell in 1976. He joined the Boston law firm Hale and Dorr and went on to become chair of the litigation department and then managing partner of the firm. He steered the firm’s 2004 merger with Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, then served for seven years as the new firm’s co-managing partner.A fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, Lee maintains an active trial practice nationwide. He has served on numerous advisory committees to federal and state courts, was associate counsel in the Iran-Contra investigation from 1987 to 1989, and in 1988 served as special assistant to the Massachusetts attorney general for purposes of investigating alleged racial bias in the courts.*The Harvard Corporation, formally known as the President and Fellows of Harvard College, is Harvard’s principal fiduciary governing board and the smaller of Harvard’s two boards, the other being the Board of Overseers.Nominations and advice regarding future Corporation appointments may be sent, in confidence, to corporationsearch@harvard.edu.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgAt Wednesday night’s student Senate meeting, the members discussed the core curriculum review with guest speaker Dean John McGreevy of the College of Arts and Letters and?voted on the nomination of Janie Goodson, a junior mathematics major, to take over the role of Student Union Treasurer starting?Sunday.Student body vice president Matthew Devine opened the meeting and introduced McGreevy, who gave a brief overview of the core curriculum and said the theology requirement would not be eliminated.“I’ve heard a lot about [rumors of the theology requirements’ elimination] recently, and we didn’t anticipate that,” he said. “Everyone knows that theology is central to whatever is going to happen at Notre Dame.” He said the core curriculum review committee wanted student feedback to help them make their decisions and invited senators to bring up their own concerns.“The committee is charged with overseeing a faculty-led, campus-wide — that includes students — review of current general education requirements and deliberate possible changes in the curriculum,” he saidThe University reviews the core curriculum every 10 years. In the past 46?years since the core curriculum was designed, there have been almost no changes.McGreevy said two major concerns he had heard from students were that First Year of Studies was?too similar to the high school course lineup and that there was a lack of cohesion?among first-year classes.“We hear complaints about what students refer to as ‘grade 13,’” he said. “They sometimes feel the first year at Notre Dame is too much a repetition of what they did in high school.”Most of the concerns of the Senate focused on?the lack of electives for many majors, the lack of interest and choice in the required classes and the number of credits required by the core curriculum.Students can?voice their opinions regarding the core curriculum at curriculumreview.nd.edu. There will be a student survey and?two meetings with students, one with the academic commissioners within the dorms as well as one with students chosen by their departments.After the presentation and discussion about the core curriculum, the Senate voted on the nomination by senior Kristen Parkinson, current Student Union Treasurer, of Janie Goodson to take over the position beginning Sunday?and extending for a period of one year. Parkinson presented her nomination and said Goodson would be an excellent choice.“Janie is an extremely talented and motivated individual with the passion, drive and commitment to successfully serve the student body,” Parkinson?said.The Senate?approved Goodson’s nomination.Student body president Lauren Vidal also announced one dining hall will be open for brunch and dinner each day over spring break.Tags: Core Curriculum, curriculum review, Dining Halls, Notre Dame, Senate, Student Union, Theologylast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img View Comments She’s still glowing, she’s still crowing and she’s still going 93 years strong! Tony winner Carol Channing has been hoofing, singing, making us laugh,?making us cry, and giving us “raspberries” and “jam” for the last 72 (!) years. In honor of the Oscar nominee’s big birthday, we’re saluting the spritely icon with a song.?Click below to see Channing get schooled in soul by Teresa Graves on Laugh In.?In a giant Afro wig. Obviously, this is from the ’70s. Cheers to your big day, Ms. Channing, and here’s to many,?many more!last_img

READ MORE

first_img Photo: WayneMcLaurin Did you forget to plant at the proper time? Were you too busy to plant? All excuses are accepted. Best of all, it’s still not too late to get in a garden.Many vegetables can still be planted in the last week of April or even into May. It will surprise you, too, just how quickly they grow. Many vegetables don’t do well in colder soils. Now, in warmer soil, they will take off and grow. Peppers are “hot” in late-planted Georgia gardens.center_img Here’s a look at some of the things you can grow.Plant late tomatoes. As the earlier tomatoes are retiring from production, the late-planted ones will be coming on for great eating. You can even take the suckers off the early ones and root them. Just keep them watered. Extend the great tomato season.Incredible EggplantI know many people don’t like eggplant — but it’s so good! Its dark purple fruits make it quite a pretty plant, but when you stuff those fruits with shrimp, they’re magnificent. Eggplant doesn’t do well until soils warm up in May, so now is a good time to plant.You can plant the hottest item in the garden, too, in May. Over the past few years, hot peppers — Aji, Ancho, Cayenne, Charleston Hot, Inferno, Ring of Fire, Habanero, Jalapeno, Serano, Thai Hot, Tabasco — comprise the single biggest increase in garden crops.If you have room, plant sweet potatoes, a true hot-weather crop. Get the slips from someone, or take tip cuttings (the last 8 inches of the vines). Or get some sweet potatoes from the grocery store and sprout them for the cuttings. Next fall, you’ll be glad you planted them, when the weather is cool and you smell sweet potatoes baking.Never Too Much OkraIt’s also a good time to plant one of my favorite vegetables: okra. Having grown up with it in the garden every year, on the table four or five times a week in season and frozen or pickled at other times, I still love it.Okra is from tropical Africa and does best when planted later in the season. I’ve heard all of the stories and jokes about the properties of okra “juice,” but this texture can be remedied.Allow small, raw okra in Italian salad dressing to marinate for 1 hour — this is much like a pickled product and is excellent in salads.However, remember that the properties that make okra objectionable for some uneducated palates is the critical ingredient for making that famous Creole shrimp gumbo.There’s still plenty of time for good gardening and even greater eating from your garden.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgA newly-hired University of Georgia entomologist hopes to develop genetic resources to understand fire ant success in the southeastern United States. Ultimately, this research could lead to new methods to reduce the number of fire ants inflicting pain on humans and taking over lawns and pastures across Georgia.“I’m searching for methods to knock down specific genes in the fire ant. The ability to perturb gene function can help us better understand the basis of traits related to fire ant social structure and population density,” said Brendan Hunt, an entomologist in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the newest faculty member of the Griffin campus.Knowing more about fire ant genetics could lead to new control applications, he said.Hunt earned a doctorate at Georgia Tech where he studied fire ant genetics and molecular evolution of social insects. He was also involved with the sequencing of the fire ant genome. He is also interested in how environmental factors affect animal development. Hunt says a “model example” of the environment’s influence on development can be found in honeybees and fire ants. “A female honeybee or fire ant egg can develop either into a queen or a worker and based on nutritional and feeding differences during their development,” he said. “A queen actively produces and lays eggs for a long time and lives for a long time while a worker is basically sterile.” To build his research program at UGA, Hunt is collecting fire ants, an easy task as he’s found plenty living outside his office. “They are everywhere on this campus, which is great for me. One of the reasons fire ants are so successful is that they love mowed lawns, meadows and farmland,” Hunt said. In addition to studying fire ants, Hunt teaches undergraduate classes on the UGA Griffin campus. For information on how to control fire ants in Georgia, see the UGA CAES publication “Managing Imported Fire Ants in Urban Areas” at www.caes.uga.edu/publications.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Wall Street Journal ($):Who is the world’s largest operator of wind and solar farms? It’s also America’s most valuable power company. Still stumped? It’s by design.“That is a marketing problem…that we foster intentionally,” Michael O’Sullivan, NextEra Energy Inc.’s head of renewable development, told University of Notre Dame students in 2015.NextEra has been careful to build sites only after it has customers lined up, avoiding debt problems that sank rivals such as SunEdison Inc. And it has assiduously avoided the kind of claims of altruistic motives that are common among some green-energy companies.NextEra, as America’s most valuable power company, has a market capitalization of $74 billion. In 2001, the company, formerly Florida Power & Light, was the 30th largest U.S. power company, with a $10.2 billion valuation. It said in 2017 federal filings it produced more megawatt-hours of electricity from wind and solar farms than any company in the world; regulatory documents suggest it is, indeed, a bigger wind and solar producer than its largest global competitors, in Europe and China.The way it captured the lead in the renewables market has allowed NextEra to grow despite the fact that the electricity industry has struggled with flat demand for power. The U.S. government expects power companies to generate $4.8 billion in renewable-energy tax credits this year, and NextEra is poised to be the largest generator of them, selling some to other corporations interested in lowering their tax bills and using the rest to shrink its own.More ($): How a Florida utility became the global king of green power NextEra quietly builds world’s largest renewable energy companylast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Thousands of Star Wars, Star Trek, comic book and various other enthusiasts packed the Cradle of Aviation Museum this weekend for Eternal Con, billed as Long Island’s largest multi-media pop culture convention.Fans filled all three levels of the museum for the eclectic convention, where they lined up for chances to meet celebrities ranging from sci-fi series actors, graphic novel artists, WWE wrestlers and rock stars. Just as entertaining were attendees dressed in elaborate costumes, playing the roles of their favorite characters—dedicated fans known as cosplayers, short for costume play.“I started making costumes for my children for New York City Comic Con and I thought, this is fun, I want to do this too, so I made it a family event.” Adaina Velez, an Eternal Con costume contest judge, said. “I also love looking at all the effort people have put into their costumes and making new friends at the conventions.”On hand to greet fans in “artist alley” were notable comic book artists such as John Romita Jr., known for his work on Spiderman, as well as upcoming artists who signed autographs, posed for pictures and, of course, sold copies of their latest issues.Aside from the many vendors were selling countless collectibles, no such convention would be complete without the costume parade, which stepped off Saturday morning and ended in a costume contest that afternoon.Celebrities on hand for meet and greets and photo ops included the original cast of the Power Rangers, Marina Sirtis of Star Trek, Gigi Edgley of Farscape and many others. Also on hand were several WWE wrestling celebrities including Chyna, plus Markey Ramone, longtime drummer for The Ramones.Scheduled to appear was actress Nichelle Nichols, who played Lt. Uhura on the original Star Trek series. But, the 82-year-old actress suffered a minor stroke on June 3 and had to cancel her appearance. The celebrities who made it were generous with their time.“I adore getting to spend moments and have a proper interaction with the people who have made my passion in life a reality,” Australia actress Gigi Edgley, who plays Chiana on the series Farscape, told the Press.Fans dressed up as their favorite characters in what is known as “cosplay.” (Photos by Joe Nuzzo)last_img read more

READ MORE
亚洲中文字幕人成影院_亚洲色炮av图_抽搐一进一出gif试看体验区